About WWMC

Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

Is there a fee to participate in WWMC?
There is no fee to participate in the program; however, there is a cost associated with purchasing a
test kit should you wish to do so. 

» Back to Top

What are the parameters of the test kit?
World Water Monitoring Challenge (WWMC) Kits include everything you need to test the four "snapshot" parameters of watershed health: temperature, pH, turbidity and dissolved oxygen.
Click here to read more about the two types of kits offered. 

» Back to Top 

Can we use our own monitoring equipment?
Yes. The WWMC kits were designed to be accurate, yet accessible, technology for all levels of experience. However, you may also participate using your own monitoring equipment. Younger children should be supervised by an adult when using the kit to conduct water quality testing.
 

» Back to Top 

When is the WWMC monitoring period?
The monitoring period occurs any day/time between March 22 (World Water Day) and December 31. The WWMC coordinators officially observe World Water Monitoring Day on September 18 each year.
 

» Back to Top 

What happens at the end of the monitoring period?
This is an exciting time of collecting and analyzing the data. All data must be entered by December 31 to be included in the the year's annual report. In the meanwhile, participants are encouraged to write stories and publishing photos highlighting their events on the WWMC Web site and on their own Web sites and publications. Involvement leads to information, which leads to excitement for more involvement, which leads to greater understanding and care for our water resources!
 

 » Back to Top 

Can we view the data all year long?
Yes, you may access archived WWMC data under the Data & Reports menu. Current data will be updated periodically and made available on this page. You may also view WWMC data in real time via the WWMC Map.  

» Back to Top 

Could you donate kits to me or my organization?
The core of WWMC is built on volunteerism on the part of the participant. Through the generosity of our sponsors, there is a limited number of test kits available for parties from low- and middle-income countries (LMCs) on a case-by-case basis. For more information, please
click here. 

» Back to Top 

What are the methods of payment for test kits?
LaMotte Company, Sword Scientific, and Ansam (distributors of the kit) accept MasterCard, VISA, and American Express.
 

» Back to Top 

Do I have to pay individual shipping charges for bulk orders in the United States?
LaMotte will accept bulk orders of 10 or more kits and ship at the reduced rate of US $1.85 per Basic Kit. Orders of three or more Classroom Kits will be shipped at a rate of US $7.50 per kit. The regular rates are US $8.30 and US $10.50 via Priority Mail.
 

» Back to Top 

 Are there shipping or environmental restrictions on the kit contents?
No. Reagents and water that have been tested may be flushed down the drain with excess water.
 

» Back to Top 

 Are there customs issues when sending kits out of the USA?
Each kit is marked “Educational Materials, Not for Resale”, but each country has its own rules. Occasionally, local jurisdictions seek fees for releasing the kits.
 

» Back to Top

Is the kit limited to fresh water only locations, or is it capable of testing ocean water too?
While the kits were not designed for use in saltwater, they do work fine in saltwater. Selected waterbody types we accept are: bay, canal, ditch, drain, estuary, lake, ocean, pond, reservoir, river, spring/seep, straight, stream/creek, and wetlands.
 

» Back to Top 

 What water resources should I test?  

WWMC kits can be used with any surface water source: bay, canal, ditch, drain, estuary, lake, ocean, pond, reservoir, river, spring/seep, straight, stream/creek, and wetlands. 

» Back to Top 

 Should I test my tap water?    

The basic WWMC kit should not be used to test tap water.  A tap water kit can be ordered through a number of vendors listed here.

» Back to Top 

If I don't live near a surface water source, how do I participate?    

In some areas, your closest source of testable surface water may be outside of your community.  In the United States, the EPA's Surf Your Watershed is a great resource to locate the closest surface water in your area.

» Back to Top 

Can we add macroinvertebrates to our monitoring? Is there a place to add this data to the WWMC database?
The system has been set up to accept rudimentary data for benthic studies. Expanding your monitoring efforts to include a variety of additional tests is encouraged (remember, safety first).
 

» Back to Top
 

Are there local organizations that I can partner with?
In the United States use EPA's National Directory of Volunteer Environmental Monitoring Program Database.  

» Back to Top 

When registering, is there a way to pull up previously entered information, or do I have to enter all the data in new again?
You can participate in the program again this year and add new data to any sites you have registered since 2007. Data entered prior to 2007 will need to be reentered. Archived data is available on an Excel spreadsheet under the
Data & Reports menu. 

» Back to Top

I am having a problem with online registration.
Send an email with a detailed explanation of your difficulty to 
wwmc@earthecho.org. 

» Back to Top 

Are materials available in Spanish or other languages?
The World Water Monitoring Challenge brochure and test kit instruction booklet are currently available in English, Spanish, French, Chinese, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic, German, Hebrew, Italian, Romanian, Dutch, Polish, Bulgarian, Thai, Vietnamese and Hindi. Hard copies of the children's story A Waterproof Case are available in Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Romanian (in addition to English). The Water Down Under is also available in Spanish (in addition to English). The WWMC test kit contains instructions in both English and Spanish. These items may be downloaded from the
Resources section.  

» Back to Top

What are the "generally accepted Quality Assurance Protocols" for the water quality monitoring and where can I find them?
The
Quality Assurance Protocols can be found on the U.S. EPA's Web site. 

» Back to Top 


 Once I've tested my local water and uploaded the data, what are the next steps I should take to protect my water resources? 

Every community is different with unique challenges to improve local water quality.  There are a number of things each of us can do regardless of where we live.

 

  • Understand your impact - Now that you've tested your water, it's important to understand what the results mean for the health of your local water resources. Turbidity, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen are indicators that help us understand what's happening in our waterways and they provide us with information on what needs to be done to improve water quality.  Go to the Resources page to learn more about what you can do. 
  • Act - From the products we use to the food we eat, the things we do every day have an impact on our water and the environment.  Taking steps to understand that impact can help you identify and make simple changes to help improve water quality and health.  Find ways you can take action today on the Resources page. 
  • Partner- Many communities have local organizations that are involved in efforts to improve water quality and health.  They can be allies in identifying ways to improve your local water resources.  Visit EPA's National Directory of Volunteer Environmental Monitoring Programs to get started today. 

» Back to Top